Data_Sheet_1_Computational Simulations Identified Marine-Derived Natural Bioactive Compounds as Replication Inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2.docx (3.23 MB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Computational Simulations Identified Marine-Derived Natural Bioactive Compounds as Replication Inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2.docx

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posted on 21.04.2021, 05:30 by Vikas Kumar, Shraddha Parate, Sanghwa Yoon, Gihwan Lee, Keun Woo Lee

The rapid spread of COVID-19, caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a worldwide health emergency. Unfortunately, to date, a very small number of remedies have been to be found effective against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Therefore, further research is required to achieve a lasting solution against this deadly disease. Repurposing available drugs and evaluating natural product inhibitors against target proteins of SARS-CoV-2 could be an effective approach to accelerate drug discovery and development. With this strategy in mind, we derived Marine Natural Products (MNP)-based drug-like small molecules and evaluated them against three major target proteins of the SARS-CoV-2 virus replication cycle. A drug-like database from MNP library was generated using Lipinski’s rule of five and ADMET descriptors. A total of 2,033 compounds were obtained and were subsequently subjected to molecular docking with 3CLpro, PLpro, and RdRp. The docking analyses revealed that a total of 14 compounds displayed better docking scores than the reference compounds and have significant molecular interactions with the active site residues of SARS-CoV-2 virus targeted proteins. Furthermore, the stability of docking-derived complexes was analyzed using molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations. The analyses revealed two hit compounds against each targeted protein displaying stable behavior, binding affinity, and molecular interactions. Our investigation identified two hit compounds against each targeted proteins displaying stable behavior, higher binding affinity and key residual molecular interactions, with good in silico pharmacokinetic properties, therefore can be considered for further in vitro studies.

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