Data_Sheet_1_Complimentary Methods for Multivariate Genome-Wide Association Study Identify New Susceptibility Genes for Blood Cell Traits.docx (1.39 MB)

Data_Sheet_1_Complimentary Methods for Multivariate Genome-Wide Association Study Identify New Susceptibility Genes for Blood Cell Traits.docx

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posted on 26.04.2019 by Segun Fatumo, Tommy Carstensen, Oyekanmi Nashiru, Deepti Gurdasani, Manjinder Sandhu, Pontiano Kaleebu

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have found hundreds of novel loci associated with full blood count (FBC) phenotypes. However, most of these studies were performed in a single phenotype framework without putting into consideration the clinical relatedness among traits. In this work, in addition to the standard univariate GWAS, we also use two different multivariate methods to perform the first multiple traits GWAS of FBC traits in ∼7000 individuals from the Ugandan General Population Cohort (GPC). We started by performing the standard univariate GWAS approach. We then performed our first multivariate method, in this approach, we tested for marker associations with 15 FBC traits simultaneously in a multivariate mixed model implemented in GEMMA while accounting for the relatedness of individuals and pedigree structures, as well as population substructure. In this analysis, we provide a framework for the combination of multiple phenotypes in multivariate GWAS analysis and show evidence of multi-collinearity whenever the correlation between traits exceeds the correlation coefficient threshold of r2 >=0.75. This approach identifies two known and one novel loci. In the second multivariate method, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) to the same 15 correlated FBC traits. We then tested for marker associations with each PC in univariate linear mixed models implemented in GEMMA. We show that the FBC composite phenotype as assessed by each PC expresses information that is not completely encapsulated by the individual FBC traits, as this approach identifies three known and five novel loci that were not identified using both the standard univariate and multivariate GWAS methods. Across both multivariate methods, we identified six novel loci. As a proof of concept, both multivariate methods also identified known loci, HBB and ITFG3. The two multivariate methods show that multivariate genotype-phenotype methods increase power and identify novel genotype-phenotype associations not found with the standard univariate GWAS in the same dataset.

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