Data_Sheet_1_Co-registration Comparison of On-Scalp Magnetoencephalography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.docx (662.96 kB)

Data_Sheet_1_Co-registration Comparison of On-Scalp Magnetoencephalography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.docx

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posted on 13.08.2021, 04:40 by Fuzhi Cao, Nan An, Weinan Xu, Wenli Wang, Yanfei Yang, Min Xiang, Yang Gao, Xiaolin Ning

Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can non-invasively measure the electromagnetic activity of the brain. A new type of MEG, on-scalp MEG, has attracted the attention of researchers recently. Compared to the conventional SQUID-MEG, on-scalp MEG constructed with optically pumped magnetometers is wearable and has a high signal-to-noise ratio. While the co-registration between MEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) significantly influences the source localization accuracy, co-registration error requires assessment, and quantification. Recent studies have evaluated the co-registration error of on-scalp MEG mainly based on the surface fit error or the repeatability error of different measurements, which do not reflect the true co-registration error. In this study, a three-dimensional-printed reference phantom was constructed to provide the ground truth of MEG sensor locations and orientations relative to MRI. The co-registration performances of commonly used three devices—electromagnetic digitization system, structured-light scanner, and laser scanner—were compared and quantified by the indices of final co-registration errors in the reference phantom and human experiments. Furthermore, the influence of the co-registration error on the performance of source localization was analyzed via simulations. The laser scanner had the best co-registration accuracy (rotation error of 0.23° and translation error of 0.76 mm based on the phantom experiment), whereas the structured-light scanner had the best cost performance. The results of this study provide recommendations and precautions for researchers regarding selecting and using an appropriate device for the co-registration of on-scalp MEG and MRI.

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