Data_Sheet_1_Co-infection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli Triggers Inflammatory Injury Involving the IL-17 Signaling Pathway.ZIP (20.93 MB)
Download file

Data_Sheet_1_Co-infection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli Triggers Inflammatory Injury Involving the IL-17 Signaling Pathway.ZIP

Download (20.93 MB)
dataset
posted on 15.11.2019, 04:36 by Zhiyong Wu, Liangjun Ding, Jiaxin Bao, Yuhao Liu, Qiaomei Zhang, Jian Wang, Rui Li, Muhammad Ishfaq, Jichang Li

Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli are well known respiratory disease-inducing pathogens. Previous studies have reported that co-infection by MG and E.coli causes significant economic loss in the poultry industry. In order to assess the respiratory toxicity of co-infection in chicken lung, we established a co-infection model to investigate changes in the inflammatory cytokines, lung tissue structure, and transcriptome profiles of chicken lung. The results showed that co-infection caused a wider range of immune damage and more severe tissue lesions than single-pathogen infection. Differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis indicated that 3,115/1,498/1,075 genes were significantly expressed among the three infection groups, respectively. Gene ontology and KEGG analysis showed genes enriched in response to immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and inflammation-related signaling pathways. Among these pathways, IL-17 signaling was found to be significantly enriched only in co-infection. The expression of IL-17C, CIKS, TRAF6, NFκB, C/EBPβ, and inflammatory chemokines were significantly up-regulated in response to co-infection. Taken together, we concluded that co-infection increased the expression of inflammatory chemokines in lungs through IL-17 signaling, leading to cilia loss and excessive mucus secretion. These results provide new insights into co-infection and reveal target proteins for drug therapy.

History

References