Data_Sheet_1_Co-development of a Best Practice Checklist for Mental Health Data Science: A Delphi Study.docx (46.07 kB)
Download file

Data_Sheet_1_Co-development of a Best Practice Checklist for Mental Health Data Science: A Delphi Study.docx

Download (46.07 kB)
dataset
posted on 10.06.2021, 04:47 by Elizabeth J. Kirkham, Catherine J. Crompton, Matthew H. Iveson, Iona Beange, Andrew M. McIntosh, Sue Fletcher-Watson

Background: Mental health research is commonly affected by difficulties in recruiting and retaining participants, resulting in findings which are based on a sub-sample of those actually living with mental illness. Increasing the use of Big Data for mental health research, especially routinely-collected data, could improve this situation. However, steps to facilitate this must be enacted in collaboration with those who would provide the data - people with mental health conditions.

Methods: We used the Delphi method to create a best practice checklist for mental health data science. Twenty participants with both expertise in data science and personal experience of mental illness worked together over three phases. In Phase 1, participants rated a list of 63 statements and added any statements or topics that were missing. Statements receiving a mean score of 5 or more (out of 7) were retained. These were then combined with the results of a rapid thematic analysis of participants' comments to produce a 14-item draft checklist, with each item split into two components: best practice now and best practice in the future. In Phase 2, participants indicated whether or not each item should remain in the checklist, and items that scored more than 50% endorsement were retained. In Phase 3 participants rated their satisfaction with the final checklist.

Results: The final checklist was made up of 14 “best practice” items, with each item covering best practice now and best practice in the future. At the end of the three phases, 85% of participants were (very) satisfied with the two best practice checklists, with no participants expressing dissatisfaction.

Conclusions: Increased stakeholder involvement is essential at every stage of mental health data science. The checklist produced through this work represents the views of people with experience of mental illness, and it is hoped that it will be used to facilitate trustworthy and innovative research which is inclusive of a wider range of individuals.

History