Data_Sheet_1_Changes of the Gastric Mucosal Microbiome Associated With Histological Stages of Gastric Carcinogenesis.ZIP (59.8 kB)

Data_Sheet_1_Changes of the Gastric Mucosal Microbiome Associated With Histological Stages of Gastric Carcinogenesis.ZIP

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posted on 29.05.2020 by Zikai Wang, Xuefeng Gao, Ranran Zeng, Qiong Wu, Huaibo Sun, Wenming Wu, Xiaomei Zhang, Gang Sun, Bin Yan, Lili Wu, Rongrong Ren, Mingzhou Guo, Lihua Peng, Yunsheng Yang

The changes of gastric microbiome across stages of neoplastic progression remain poorly understood, especially for intraepithelial neoplasia (IN) which has been recognized as a phenotypic bridge between atrophic/intestinal metaplastic lesions and invasive cancer. The gastric microbiota was investigated in 30 healthy controls (HC), 21 non-atrophic chronic gastritis (CG), 27 gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM), 25 IN, and 29 gastric cancer (GC) patients by 16S rRNA gene profiling. The bacterial diversity, and abundances of phyla Armatimonadetes, Chloroflexi, Elusimicrobia, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and WS3 reduced progressively from CG, through IM, IN to GC. Actinobacteria, Bacteriodes, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, SR1, and TM7 were enriched in the IN and GC. At the community level, the proportions of Gram-positive and anaerobic bacteria increased in the IN and GC compared to other histological types, whereas the aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria taxa were significantly reduced in GC. Remarkable changes in the gastric microbiota functions were detected after the formation of IN. The reduced nitrite-oxidizing phylum Nitrospirae together with a decreased nitrate/nitrite reductase functions indicated nitrate accumulation during neoplastic progression. We constructed a random forest model, which had a very high accuracy (AUC > 0.95) in predicating the histological types with as low as five gastric bacterial taxa. In summary, the changing patterns of the gastric microbiota composition and function are highly indicative of stages of neoplastic progression.

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