Data_Sheet_1_Behavioral Traits Associated With Resilience to the Effects of Repeated Social Defeat on Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference in .docx (686.3 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Behavioral Traits Associated With Resilience to the Effects of Repeated Social Defeat on Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference in Mice.docx

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posted on 09.01.2020, 04:19 by Claudia Calpe-López, Maria Pilar García-Pardo, Maria Angeles Martínez-Caballero, Alejandra Santos-Ortíz, Maria Asunción Aguilar

The relationship between stress and drug use is well demonstrated. Stress-induced by repeated social defeat (RSD) enhances the conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by cocaine in mice. The phenomenon of resilience understood as the ability of subjects to overcome the negative effects of stress is the focus of increasing interest. Our aim is to characterize the behavior of resilient animals with respect to the effects of RSD on the CPP induced by cocaine. To this end, 25 male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to stress by RSD during late adolescence, while other 15 male mice did not undergo stress (controls). On the 2 days following the last defeat, all the animals carried out the elevated plus maze (EPM) and Hole Board, Social Interaction, Tail Suspension and Splash tests. Three weeks later, all the animals performed the CPP paradigm with a low dose of cocaine (1 mg/kg). Exposure to RSD decreased all measurements related to the open arms of the EPM. It also reduced social interaction, immobility in the tail suspension test (TST) and grooming in the splash test. RSD exposure also increased the sensitivity of the mice to the rewarding effects of cocaine, since only defeated animals acquired CPP. Several behavioral traits were related to resilience to the potentiating effect of RSD on cocaine CPP. Mice that showed less submission during defeat episodes, a lower percentage of time in the open arms of the EPM, low novelty-seeking, high social interaction, greater immobility in the TST and a higher frequency of grooming were those that were resilient to the long-term effects of social defeat on cocaine reward since they behaved like controls and did not develop CPP. These results suggest that the behavioral profile of resilient defeated mice is characterized by an active coping response during episodes of defeat, a greater concern for potential dangers, less reactivity in a situation of inevitable moderate stress and fewer depressive-like symptoms after stress. Determining the neurobehavioral substrates of resilience is the first step towards developing behavioral or pharmacological interventions that increase resilience in individuals at a high risk of suffering from stress.

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