Data_Sheet_1_Assessing the Role of Selenium in Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Mendelian Randomization Study.docx (21.99 kB)

Data_Sheet_1_Assessing the Role of Selenium in Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Mendelian Randomization Study.docx

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posted on 27.03.2019 by Pik Fang Kho, Dylan M. Glubb, Deborah J. Thompson, Amanda B. Spurdle, Tracy A. O'Mara

Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecological cancer in developed countries. Based on evidence from observational studies which suggest selenium inhibits the development of several cancers (including lung and prostate cancer), selenium supplementation has been touted as a potential cancer preventative agent. However, randomized controlled trials have not reported benefit for selenium supplementation in reducing cancer risk. For endometrial cancer, limited observational studies have been conducted assessing whether selenium intake, or blood selenium levels, associated with reduced risk, and no randomized controlled trials have been conducted. We performed a two-sample Mendelian randomization analysis to examine the relationship between selenium levels (using a composite measure of blood and toenail selenium) and endometrial cancer risk, using summary statistics for four genetic variants associated with selenium levels at genome-wide significance levels (P < 5 × 10−8), from a study of 12,906 endometrial cancer cases and 108,979 controls, all of European ancestry. Inverse variance weighted (IVW) analysis indicated no evidence of a causal role for selenium levels in endometrial cancer development (OR per unit increase in selenium levels Z-score = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.87–1.14). Similar results were observed for sensitivity analyses robust to the presence of unknown pleiotropy (OR per unit increase in selenium levels Z-score = 0.98, 95% CI 0.89–1.08 for weighted median; OR per unit increase in selenium levels Z-score = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.53–1.50 for MR-Egger). In conclusion, these results do not support the use of selenium supplementation to prevent endometrial cancer.

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