Data_Sheet_1_Assessing Cardiomyocyte Excitation-Contraction Coupling Site Detection From Live Cell Imaging Using a Structurally-Realistic Computationa.pdf (1.61 MB)

Data_Sheet_1_Assessing Cardiomyocyte Excitation-Contraction Coupling Site Detection From Live Cell Imaging Using a Structurally-Realistic Computational Model of Calcium Release.pdf

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posted on 02.10.2019 by David Ladd, Agnė Tilūnaitė, H. Llewelyn Roderick, Christian Soeller, Edmund J. Crampin, Vijay Rajagopal

Calcium signaling plays a pivotal role in cardiomyocytes, coupling electrical excitation to mechanical contraction of the heart. Determining locations of active calcium release sites, and how their recruitment changes in response to stimuli and in disease states is therefore of central interest in cardiac physiology. Current algorithms for detecting release sites from live cell imaging data are however not easily validated against a known “ground truth,” which makes interpretation of the output of such algorithms, in particular the degree of confidence in site detection, a challenging task. Computational models are capable of integrating findings from multiple sources into a consistent, predictive framework. In cellular physiology, such models have the potential to reveal structure and function beyond the temporal and spatial resolution limitations of individual experimental measurements. Here, we create a spatially detailed computational model of calcium release in an eight sarcomere section of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, using electron tomography reconstruction of cardiac ultrastructure and confocal imaging of protein localization. This provides a high-resolution model of calcium diffusion from intracellular stores, which can be used as a platform to simulate confocal fluorescence imaging in the context of known ground truth structures from the higher resolution model. We use this capability to evaluate the performance of a recently proposed method for detecting the functional response of calcium release sites in live cells. Model permutations reveal how calcium release site density and mitochondria acting as diffusion barriers impact the detection performance of the algorithm. We demonstrate that site density has the greatest impact on detection precision and recall, in particular affecting the effective detectable depth of sites in confocal data. Our findings provide guidance on how such detection algorithms may best be applied to experimental data and give insights into limitations when using two-dimensional microscopy images to analyse three-dimensional cellular structures.

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