Data_Sheet_1_Adaptation of Microbial Communities to Environmental Arsenic and Selection of Arsenite-Oxidizing Bacteria From Contaminated Groundwaters.xlsx (24.27 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Adaptation of Microbial Communities to Environmental Arsenic and Selection of Arsenite-Oxidizing Bacteria From Contaminated Groundwaters.xlsx

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posted on 19.03.2021, 04:09 authored by Sarah Zecchin, Simona Crognale, Patrizia Zaccheo, Stefano Fazi, Stefano Amalfitano, Barbara Casentini, Matteo Callegari, Raffaella Zanchi, Gian Attilio Sacchi, Simona Rossetti, Lucia Cavalca

Arsenic mobilization in groundwater systems is driven by a variety of functionally diverse microorganisms and complex interconnections between different physicochemical factors. In order to unravel this great ecosystem complexity, groundwaters with varying background concentrations and speciation of arsenic were considered in the Po Plain (Northern Italy), one of the most populated areas in Europe affected by metalloid contamination. High-throughput Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing, CARD-FISH and enrichment of arsenic-transforming consortia showed that among the analyzed groundwaters, diverse microbial communities were present, both in terms of diversity and functionality. Oxidized inorganic arsenic [arsenite, As(III)] was the main driver that shaped each community. Several uncharacterized members of the genus Pseudomonas, putatively involved in metalloid transformation, were revealed in situ in the most contaminated samples. With a cultivation approach, arsenic metabolisms potentially active at the site were evidenced. In chemolithoautotrophic conditions, As(III) oxidation rate linearly correlated to As(III) concentration measured at the parental sites, suggesting that local As(III) concentration was a relevant factor that selected for As(III)-oxidizing bacterial populations. In view of the exploitation of these As(III)-oxidizing consortia in biotechnology-based arsenic bioremediation actions, these results suggest that contaminated aquifers in Northern Italy host unexplored microbial populations that provide essential ecosystem services.

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