Data_Sheet_1_Accelerometry-Based Step Count Validation for Horse Movement Analysis During Stall Confinement.pdf (304.15 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Accelerometry-Based Step Count Validation for Horse Movement Analysis During Stall Confinement.pdf

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posted on 22.06.2021, 04:28 by Samantha L. Steinke, Julia B. Montgomery, John M. Barden

Quantitative tracking of equine movement during stall confinement has the potential to detect subtle changes in mobility due to injury. These changes may warn of potential complications, providing vital information to direct rehabilitation protocols. Inertial measurement units (IMUs) are readily available and easily attached to a limb or surcingle to objectively record step count in horses. The objectives of this study were: (1) to compare IMU-based step counts to a visually-based criterion measure (video) for three different types of movements in a stall environment, and (2) to compare three different sensor positions to determine the ideal location on the horse to assess movement. An IMU was attached at the withers, right forelimb and hindlimb of six horses to assess free-movement, circles, and figure-eights recorded in 5 min intervals and to determine the best location, through analysis of all three axes of the triaxial accelerometer, for step count during stall confinement. Mean step count difference, absolute error (%) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were determined to assess the sensor's ability to track steps compared to the criterion measure. When comparing sensor location for all movement conditions, the right-forelimb vertical-axis produced the best results (ICC = 1.0, % error = 6.8, mean step count difference = 1.3) followed closely by the right-hindlimb (ICC = 0.999, % error = 15.2, mean step count difference = 1.8). Limitations included the small number of horse participants and the lack of random selection due to limited availability and accessibility. Overall, the findings demonstrate excellent levels of agreement between the IMU's vertical axis and the video-based criterion at the forelimb and hindlimb locations for all movement conditions.

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