Data_Sheet_1_Abdominal Adiposity and Total Body Fat as Predictors of Cardiometabolic Health in Children and Adolescents With Obesity.pdf (438.49 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Abdominal Adiposity and Total Body Fat as Predictors of Cardiometabolic Health in Children and Adolescents With Obesity.pdf

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posted on 04.09.2020, 04:12 by Binghan Jin, Hu Lin, Jinna Yuan, Guanping Dong, Ke Huang, Wei Wu, Xuefeng Chen, Li Zhang, Jinling Wang, Xinyi Liang, Yangli Dai, Xiaoqin Xu, Xuelian Zhou, Mingqiang Zhu, Guohua Li, Wayne S. Cutfield, Paul L. Hofman, José G. B. Derraik, Junfen Fu

Objective: We aimed to assess the role of adipose tissue distribution in cardiometabolic risk (in particular insulin sensitivity) in a population of children and adolescents with obesity.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, participants were 479 children and adolescents with obesity (322 boys and 157 girls) aged 3 to 18 years attending the Children's Hospital at Zhejiang University School of Medicine (Hangzhou, China). Clinical assessments included anthropometry, body composition (DXA scans), carotid artery ultrasounds, and OGTT. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using the Matsuda index. Participants were stratified into groups by sex and pubertal stage. Key predictors were DXA-derived android-to-gynoid-fat ratio (A/G) and total body fat percentage (TBF%).

Results: Irrespective of sex and pubertal stage, there was a strong association between increasing A/G (i.e., greater abdominal adiposity) and lower insulin sensitivity. In multivariable models, every 0.1 increase in A/G was associated with a reduction in insulin sensitivity in prepubertal boys [−29% (95% CI −36%, −20%); p < 0.0001], pubertal boys [−13% (95% CI −21%, −6%); p = 0.001], and pubertal girls [−16% (95% CI −24%, −6%); p = 0.002]. In contrast, TBF% was not associated with insulin sensitivity when A/G was adjusted for, irrespective of pubertal stage or sex. In addition, every 0.1 increase in A/G was associated with increased likelihood of dyslipidemia in prepubertal boys [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.62 (95% CI 1.05, 2.49)], impaired glucose tolerance in pubertal boys [aOR 1.64 (95% CI 1.07, 2.51)] and pubertal girls [aOR 1.81 (95% CI 1.10, 2.98)], and odds of NAFLD in both prepubertal [aOR 2.57 (95% CI 1.56, 4.21)] and pubertal [aOR 1.69 (95% CI 1.18, 2.40)] boys. In contrast, higher TBF% was only associated with higher fasting insulin and ALT in pubertal boys, being also predictive of NAFLD in this group [aOR 1.15 per percentage point (95% CI 1.06, 1.26)], but was not associated with the likelihood of other cardiometabolic outcomes assessed in any group.

Conclusions: A/G is a much stronger independent predictor of cardiometabolic risk factors in children and adolescents with obesity in China, particularly glucose metabolism.

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