DataSheet_1_Opioid Addiction/Pregnancy and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS): A Preliminary Open-Label Study of Buprenorphine Maintenance and Drug Us.pdf (42.69 kB)

DataSheet_1_Opioid Addiction/Pregnancy and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS): A Preliminary Open-Label Study of Buprenorphine Maintenance and Drug Use Targeted Psychotherapy (DUST) on Cessation of Addictive Drug Use.pdf

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posted on 23.09.2020 by Sarah Tabi, Sarah A. Heitner, Swati Shivale, Scott Minchenberg, Stephen V. Faraone, Brian Johnson
Background

Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is common, expensive, and hurts opioid addicted women and their families. Current treatments do not sufficiently address comorbid addictions, especially tobacco use, among pregnant buprenorphine-maintained women.

Methods

25 consecutive admissions of pregnant, opioid addicted women were treated with buprenorphine maintenance and a novel intervention for pregnant opioid addicted patients, Drug Use Targeted Therapy (DUST). DUST entails a combination of informing women about the impact of various drugs on their fetus, discussing the woman’s thinking about these consequences of drug use, and varying the frequency of psychotherapy; increasing if addictive drugs are used and decreasing if the woman wishes when drug use is stopped.

Results

20/25 remained in treatment until delivery. All 20 women were using addictive drugs at admission. None were planned pregnancies. There was a high prevalence of emotional, physical or sexual abuse, criminal behavior, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and chronic pain. Nineteen stopped all addictive drugs. NAS was present for 5 out of 19 newborns with a duration of hospitalization from 4 to 6 days.

Conclusions

This preliminary open-label case series found that pregnant buprenorphine maintained women can stop tobacco. What has sometimes been termed “neonatal opioid abstinence syndrome” may most accurately be termed, “neonatal opioid/tobacco abstinence syndrome.” If the treatment effectively addresses tobacco use, other addictive drugs are rarely used. DUST resulted in a 95% quit rate for addictive drugs. Pilot data on this new intervention is limited; a case series that does not have a corresponding control group.

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