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DataSheet_1_Exploring the causality and pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus in breast cancer based on Mendelian randomization and transcripto.pdf (283.69 kB)

DataSheet_1_Exploring the causality and pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus in breast cancer based on Mendelian randomization and transcriptome data analyses.pdf

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posted on 2023-01-16, 04:45 authored by Wenjie Li, Rong Wang, Wei Wang
Introduction

There has been a cumulative interest in relationships between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cancer risk. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. However, the casual association and pathogenesis between SLE and breast cancer remains incompletely unknown.

Methods

Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis was first conducted to investigate the potential causality between SLE and breast cancer. Sensitivity analyses were applied to validate the reliability of MR results. Transcriptomic data analyses based on the Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus databases were then performed to identify and construct a SLE-related gene signature (SLEscore).

Results

The MR analysis demonstrated that genetic predisposition to SLE was casually associated with the decreased risk of breast cancer in the East Asian cohort (odds ratios: 0.95, 95% confidence interval: 0.92-0.98, p=0.006). However, no casual associations were observed in the European population. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses proved the robustness of the present MR results. A prognostic SLEscore consisting of five SLE-related genes (RACGAP1, HMMR, TTK, TOP2A, and KIF15) could distribute patients with breast cancer into the high- and low-risk groups according to survival rates with good predictive ability (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

Our MR study provided evidence that genetic changes in SLE were significantly associated with the decreased risk of breast cancer in the East Asian population, while no causality was found in the European cohorts. Transcriptome data analyses indicated that the SLEscore could serve as a novel biomarker for predicting prognosis when breast cancer and SLE coexisted in patients.

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