DataSheet_1_Establishment of Reference Intervals for Thyroid-Associated Hormones Using refineR Algorithm in Chinese Population at High-Altitude Areas.docx (423.14 kB)
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DataSheet_1_Establishment of Reference Intervals for Thyroid-Associated Hormones Using refineR Algorithm in Chinese Population at High-Altitude Areas.docx

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posted on 11.02.2022, 05:07 authored by Chaochao Ma, Jian Zhong, Yutong Zou, Zhijuan Liu, Honglei Li, Jinrong Pang, Xiaoxing Liu, Zejipuchi, Liping Tian, Li’an Hou, Danchen Wang, Xinqi Cheng, Ling Qiu
Objectives

Diagnosis of thyroid disease among individuals dwelling at high altitude remains a challenge. Reference intervals (RIs) for thyroid-associated hormones among Tibetans living at various high altitudes were established to improve diagnosis.

Methods

One thousand two hundred eighty-one subjects were randomly recruited from Nyingchi, Shigatse/Lhasa, and Ali of Tibet. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxine (FT4) were measured by the Cobas e601 electrochemiluminescence analyzer. We used multiple linear regression and variance component analysis to assess the effect of sex, age, and altitude on hormones. RIs were established by refineR algorithm and compared with those provided by the manufacturer.

Results

Serum TSH was significantly lower in males than in females, while FT3 and FT4 were higher in males. Both FT3 and FT4 decreased with increasing age. FT3 increased with altitude, while TSH and FT4 were less influenced by altitude. The RI for TSH was 0.764–5.784 μIU/ml, while for FT4, the RIs were 12.36–19.38 pmol/L in females and 14.84–20.18 pmol/L in males. The RIs for FT3 at Nyingchi, Shigatse/Lhasa, and Ali in females were 4.09–4.98, 4.31–5.45, and 4.82–5.58 pmol/L, while in males, the values were 4.82–5.41, 4.88–5.95, and 5.26–6.06 pmol/L, respectively. The obtained RIs for TSH and FT4 were generally higher, while that for FT3 was narrower than the RIs provided by Cobas.

Conclusions

Specific RIs were established for thyroid-associated hormones among Tibetans, which were significantly different from those provided by the manufacturer.

History

References