DataSheet_1_Distinct Prognostic Role of Serum Uric Acid Levels for Predicting All-Cause Mortality Among Chinese Adults Aged 45~75 Years With and Witho.docx (660.68 kB)
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DataSheet_1_Distinct Prognostic Role of Serum Uric Acid Levels for Predicting All-Cause Mortality Among Chinese Adults Aged 45~75 Years With and Without Diabetes.docx

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posted on 16.11.2021, 04:51 by Bowen Zhu, Jian Zhang, Nana Song, Yiqin Shi, Yi Fang, Xiaoqiang Ding, Yang Li
Introduction

The current study sought to explore the effect of baseline serum uric acid (SUA) on the risk of all-cause mortality among Chinese adults aged 45~75 years and to determine its interaction relationship with diabetes.

Methods

The study was designed as a community-based cohort of 4467 adults aged between 45~75 years included in a 6-years follow-up period from 2009 to 2015 years by the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). Baseline SUA levels were grouped into quartiles and its association on all-cause mortality was explored using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Stratified analyses were performed to explore the associations of SUA quartiles with all-cause mortality among diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

Results

A total of 141 deaths (5.3 per 1000 person-years) were recorded During a follow-up of 26431 person-years. Out of the 141 deaths, 28 deaths (10.1 per 1000 person-years) were reported in the diabetic groups and 113 deaths (4.8 per 1000 person-years) were recorded in the non-diabetic group. An increased risk of all-cause mortality was observed for participants in the first and fourth quartiles compared with the second SUA quartile, (Q1 SUA: aHR=2.1, 95% CI 1.1~4.1; Q4 SUA: aHR=2.1, 95% CI 1.1~4.0). Stratification of participants by diabetes status showed a U-shaped association for non-diabetic individuals. Whereas, declined eGFR, rather than SUA, was an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in diabetic individuals (aHR=0.7, 95% CI 0.6~1.0).

Conclusion

Our study proved that the prognostic role of SUA for predicting all-cause death might be regulated by diabetes. Both low and high SUA levels were associated with increased mortality, supporting a U-shaped association only in non-diabetic individuals. Whereas, renal dysfunction rather than SUA was an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality. Further studies should be conducted to determine the SUA levels at which intervention should be conducted and explore target follow-up strategies to prevent progression leading to poor prognosis.

History

References