DataSheet_1_Development of a Nomogram for Predicting the Cumulative Incidence of Disease Recurrence of AML After Allo-HSCT.doc (8.29 MB)
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DataSheet_1_Development of a Nomogram for Predicting the Cumulative Incidence of Disease Recurrence of AML After Allo-HSCT.doc

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posted on 27.09.2021, 04:58 by Tongtong Zhang, Xiebing Bao, Huiying Qiu, Xiaowen Tang, Yue Han, Chengcheng Fu, Aining Sun, Changgeng Ruan, Depei Wu, Suning Chen, Yang Xu

Using targeted exome sequencing, we studied correlations between mutations at diagnosis and transplant outcomes in 332 subjects with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving allotransplantation. A total of 299 patients (299/332, 90.1%) had at least one oncogenic point mutation. In multivariable analyses, pretransplant disease status, minimal residual disease (MRD) before transplantation (pre-MRD), cytogenetic risk classification, and TP53 and FLT3-ITDhigh ratio mutations were independent risk factors for AML recurrence after allotransplantation (p < 0.05). A nomogram for the cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) that integrated all the predictors in the multivariable model was then constructed, and the concordance index (C-index) values at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months for CIR prediction were 0.754, 0.730, 0.715, and 0.690, respectively. Moreover, calibration plots showed good agreements between the actual observation and the nomogram prediction for the 6, 12, 18, and 24 months posttransplantation CIR in the internal validation. The integrated calibration index (ICI) values were 0.008, 0.055, 0.094, and 0.136 at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months posttransplantation, respectively. With a median cutoff score of 9.73 from the nomogram, all patients could be divided into two groups, and the differences in 2-year CIR, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) between these two groups were significant (p < 0.05). Taken together, the results of our study indicate that gene mutations could help to predict the outcomes of patients with AML receiving allotransplantation.

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