DataSheet_1_Crosstalk Between LXR and Caveolin-1 Signaling Supports Cholesterol Efflux and Anti-Inflammatory Pathways in Macrophages.pdf (1.4 MB)
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DataSheet_1_Crosstalk Between LXR and Caveolin-1 Signaling Supports Cholesterol Efflux and Anti-Inflammatory Pathways in Macrophages.pdf

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posted on 27.05.2021, 04:02 authored by Cristina M. Ramírez, Marta Torrecilla-Parra, Virginia Pardo-Marqués, Mario Fernández de-Frutos, Ana Pérez-García, Carlos Tabraue, Juan Vladimir de la Rosa, Patricia Martín-Rodriguez, Mercedes Díaz-Sarmiento, Uxue Nuñez, Marta C. Orizaola, Paqui G. Través, Marta Camps, Lisardo Boscá, Antonio Castrillo

Macrophages are immune cells that play crucial roles in host defense against pathogens by triggering their exceptional phagocytic and inflammatory functions. Macrophages that reside in healthy tissues also accomplish important tasks to preserve organ homeostasis, including lipid uptake/efflux or apoptotic-cell clearance. Both homeostatic and inflammatory functions of macrophages require the precise stability of lipid-rich microdomains located at the cell membrane for the initiation of downstream signaling cascades. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is the main protein responsible for the biogenesis of caveolae and plays an important role in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. The Liver X receptors (LXRs) are key transcription factors for cholesterol efflux and inflammatory gene responses in macrophages. Although the role of Cav-1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and vascular inflammation has been reported, the connection between LXR transcriptional activity and Cav-1 expression and function in macrophages has not been investigated. Here, using gain and loss of function approaches, we demonstrate that LXR-dependent transcriptional pathways modulate Cav-1 expression and compartmentation within the membrane during macrophage activation. As a result, Cav-1 participates in LXR-dependent cholesterol efflux and the control of inflammatory responses. Together, our data show modulation of the LXR-Cav-1 axis could be exploited to control exacerbated inflammation and cholesterol overload in the macrophage during the pathogenesis of lipid and immune disorders, such as atherosclerosis.

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