DataSheet_1_CO2 Elevation Accelerates Phenology and Alters Carbon/Nitrogen Metabolism vis-à-vis ROS Abundance in Bread Wheat.docx (915.65 kB)
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DataSheet_1_CO2 Elevation Accelerates Phenology and Alters Carbon/Nitrogen Metabolism vis-à-vis ROS Abundance in Bread Wheat.docx

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posted on 17.07.2020, 04:30 authored by Birendra K. Padhan, Lekshmy Sathee, Hari S. Meena, Sandeep B. Adavi, Shailendra K. Jha, Viswanathan Chinnusamy

Wheat is an important staple food crop of the world and it accounts for 18–20% of human dietary protein. Recent reports suggest that CO2 elevation (CE) reduces grain protein and micronutrient content. In our earlier study, it was found that the enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) and the concomitant decrease in transcript abundance as well as activity of nitrate reductase (NR) and high affinity nitrate transporters (HATS) resulted in CE-mediated decrease in N metabolites in wheat seedlings. In the current study, two bread wheat genotypes Gluyas Early and B.T. Schomburgk differing in nitrate uptake and assimilation properties were evaluated for their response to CE. To understand the impact of low (LN), optimal (ON) and high (HN) nitrogen supply on plant growth, phenology, N and C metabolism, ROS and RNS signaling and yield, plants were evaluated under short term (hydroponics experiment) and long term (pot experiment) CE. CE improved growth, altered N assimilation, C/N ratio, N use efficiency (NUE) in B.T. Schomburgk. In general, CE decreased shoot N concentration and grain protein concentration in wheat irrespective of N supply. CE accelerated phenology and resulted in early flowering of both the wheat genotypes. Plants grown under CE showed higher levels of nitrosothiol and ROS, mainly under optimal and high nitrogen supply. Photorespiratory ammonia assimilating genes were down regulated by CE, whereas, expression of nitrate transporter/NPF genes were differentially regulated between genotypes by CE under different N availability. The response to CE was dependent on N supply as well as genotype. Hence, N fertilizer recommendation needs to be revised based on these variables for improving plant responses to N fertilization under a future CE scenario.

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