DataSheet7_miR-92a-3p Promoted EMT via Targeting LATS1 in Cervical Cancer Stem Cells.ZIP (28.93 MB)
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DataSheet7_miR-92a-3p Promoted EMT via Targeting LATS1 in Cervical Cancer Stem Cells.ZIP

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posted on 18.11.2021, 05:16 authored by Shuangyue Liu, Liping Chu, Mingzhu Xie, Lisha Ma, Hongmei An, Wen Zhang, Jihong Deng

miR-92a-3p (microRNA-92a-3p) has been reported to be dysregulated in several cancers, and as such, it is considered to be a cancer-related microRNA. However, the influence of miR-92a-3p on biological behaviors in cervical cancer (CC) still remains unclear. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect miR-92a-3p levels in CC stem cells. Here, Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8) assay, Transwell cell invasion assay and flow cytometry assay were used to characterize the effects that miR-92a-3p and large tumor suppressor l (LATS1) had on proliferation, invasion and cell cycle transition. The luciferase reporter gene assay was used to verify the targeting relationship between miR-92a-3p and LATS1. Western Blotting was used to investigate the related signaling pathways and proteins. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed that miR-92a-3p was upregulated in CC tissues and closely associated with overall survival. miR-92a-3p promoted proliferation, invasion and cell cycle transition in CC stem cells. The luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-92a-3p bound to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of the LATS1 promoter. LATS1 inhibited proliferation, invasion and cell cycle transition. Results measured by Western Blotting showed that LATS1 downregulated expressions of transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), vimentin and cyclin E, but upregulated the expression of E-cadherin. Re-expression of LATS1 partly reversed the effects of miR-92a-3p on proliferation, invasion and cell cycle transition, as well as on TAZ, E-cadherin, vimentin, and cyclin E. miR-92a-3p promoted the malignant behavior of CC stem cells by targeting LATS1, which regulated TAZ and E-cadherin.

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