DataSheet1_Reliable and Interpretable Mortality Prediction With Strong Foresight in COVID-19 Patients: An International Study From China and Germany.PDF (2.18 MB)
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DataSheet1_Reliable and Interpretable Mortality Prediction With Strong Foresight in COVID-19 Patients: An International Study From China and Germany.PDF

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posted on 03.09.2021, 05:43 by Tao Bai, Xue Zhu, Xiang Zhou, Denise Grathwohl, Pengshuo Yang, Yuguo Zha, Yu Jin, Hui Chong, Qingyang Yu, Nora Isberner, Dongke Wang, Lei Zhang, K. Martin Kortüm, Jun Song, Leo Rasche, Hermann Einsele, Kang Ning, Xiaohua Hou

Cohort-independent robust mortality prediction model in patients with COVID-19 infection is not yet established. To build up a reliable, interpretable mortality prediction model with strong foresight, we have performed an international, bi-institutional study from China (Wuhan cohort, collected from January to March) and Germany (Würzburg cohort, collected from March to September). A Random Forest-based machine learning approach was applied to 1,352 patients from the Wuhan cohort, generating a mortality prediction model based on their clinical features. The results showed that five clinical features at admission, including lymphocyte (%), neutrophil count, C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and α-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, could be used for mortality prediction of COVID-19 patients with more than 91% accuracy and 99% AUC. Additionally, the time-series analysis revealed that the predictive model based on these clinical features is very robust over time when patients are in the hospital, indicating the strong association of these five clinical features with the progression of treatment as well. Moreover, for different preexisting diseases, this model also demonstrated high predictive power. Finally, the mortality prediction model has been applied to the independent Würzburg cohort, resulting in high prediction accuracy (with above 90% accuracy and 85% AUC) as well, indicating the robustness of the model in different cohorts. In summary, this study has established the mortality prediction model that allowed early classification of COVID-19 patients, not only at admission but also along the treatment timeline, not only cohort-independent but also highly interpretable. This model represents a valuable tool for triaging and optimizing the resources in COVID-19 patients.

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