DataSheet1_Evidence That Tumor Microenvironment Initiates Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition and Calebin A can Suppress it in Colorectal Cancer Cell.ZIP (5.02 MB)
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DataSheet1_Evidence That Tumor Microenvironment Initiates Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition and Calebin A can Suppress it in Colorectal Cancer Cells.ZIP

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posted on 02.07.2021, 05:29 by Constanze Buhrmann, Aranka Brockmueller, Choudhary Harsha, Ajaikumar B. Kunnumakkara, Peter Kubatka, Bharat B. Aggarwal, Mehdi Shakibaei

Background: Tumor microenvironment (TME) has a pivotal impact on tumor progression, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an extremely crucial initial event in the metastatic process in colorectal cancer (CRC) that is not yet fully understood. Calebin A (an ingredient in Curcuma longa) has been shown to repress CRC tumor growth. However, whether Calebin A is able to abrogate TME-induced EMT in CRC was investigated based on the underlying pathways.

Methods: CRC cell lines (HCT116, RKO) were exposed with Calebin A and/or a FAK inhibitor, cytochalasin D (CD) to investigate the action of Calebin A in TME-induced EMT-related tumor progression.

Results: TME induced viability, proliferation, and increased invasiveness in 3D-alginate CRC cultures. In addition, TME stimulated stabilization of the master EMT-related transcription factor (Slug), which was accompanied by changes in the expression patterns of EMT-associated biomarkers. Moreover, TME resulted in stimulation of NF-κB, TGF-β1, and FAK signaling pathways. However, these effects were dramatically reduced by Calebin A, comparable to FAK inhibitor or CD. Finally, TME induced a functional association between NF-κB and Slug, suggesting that a synergistic interaction between the two transcription factors is required for initiation of EMT and tumor cell invasion, whereas Calebin A strongly inhibited this binding and subsequent CRC cell migration.

Conclusion: We propose for the first time that Calebin A modulates TME-induced EMT in CRC cells, at least partially through the NF-κB/Slug axis, TGF-β1, and FAK signaling. Thus, Calebin A appears to be a potential agent for the prevention and management of CRC.

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